This collection includes select recordings of the 2017 Annual Meeting presentations and SAM credit for most of these sessions. See the table below for a list of the recordings and SAM eligible sessions in this collection.


The AMP 2017 Annual Meeting (November 16-18, 2017 in Salt Lake City, UT) showcased an impressive roster of speakers covering a wide range of topics in molecular diagnostics. The theme for the meeting was "Where Molecular Leads Medicine to Best Patient Care" and the presentations highlighted the true clinical utility for molecular diagnostics. In the AMP 2017 Annual Meeting Highlights, catch up on the the most cutting-edge research in molecular pathology in topics ranging from CRISPR technologies, liquid biopsies, and the microbiome, to epigenetic roles in human disease, to new tools for interpreting the cancer genome. Click on the "Topics" tab for a list of the available presentations and click on the titles for more information about each session.

Duration:  13.25 hrs

Last day to purchase course and claim credit: November 30, 2019

Maximum SAM credit available: 11.25

You can purchase individual talks or purchase all of the AMP 2017 Annual Meeting Highlights for a discount.

  • To purchase the entire series, click the "Add to Cart" button located on the right.
  • To purchase individual talks, click on the "Purchase Individual Topics" button on the right, and select the particular talk(s) that you would like to purchase.

 

If you have questions, please email AMPeducation@amp.org


Recordings Available

SAM Credit

Award for Excellence Lecture: The Epigenetic Basis of Common Human Disease

  • Andrew P. Feinberg, MD, MPH
No SAMs available

Molecular Genetics and Biomarkers of B-cell Leukemias and Lymphomas

  • Precursor B-cell Neoplasms (ALL)
    Charles G. Mullighan, MBBS (Hons), MSc, MD
  • Genetic and Epigenetic Drivers of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma
    Laura Pasqualucci, MD
1.5

Discovering the Links: Infectious Agents and Cancer

  • HPV and Head and Neck Cancer
    Joseph A. Califano, MD
  • Blood-based Assessment of EBV DNA as a Tumor Marker
    Jennifer A. Kanakry, MD
1.5

The Hunt for Microbes: The Beginning of the End of the Pandemic Era

  • Microbial Anthropology
    Maria G. Dominguez-Bello, PhD, BSc, MSc
  • A Collaborative Effort to End the Pandemic Era: The Global Virome Project
    Jonna Mazet, DVM, MPVM, PhD
1.5

Molecular Informatics at Scale for Genomics-based Personalized Cancer Care

  • Molecular Pathology Informatics - Toolsets and Infrastructures for Supporting Clinical Trials
    Mark Routbort, MD, PhD
  • Interpreting the Cancer Genome: Identifying Driver Alterations and Therapeutic Options*
    Nikolaus Schultz, PhD

*Only Nikolaus Schultz’s talk is eligible for SAM Credit

0.75*

High Impact Molecular Diagnostics for Cancer and Inherited Diseases

  • Solid Tumor Genotyping: Technical and Clinical Validation with a Focus on Fusions
    A. John Iafrate, MD, PhD
  • Intersection of Germline and Somatic Cancer Variants and New Areas of Clinical Utility
    Colin C. Pritchard, MD, PhD
1.5

Molecular Testing in the Practice of Cardiology

  • Phenotype to Genotype: How Traditional Techniques Pave the Way to Targeted Testing and Individualized Medicine
    Joseph J. Maleszewski, MD
  • From Genes to Genomes: Evolution of Molecular Testing for Inherited Cardiomyopathies
    Birgit Funke, PhD
1.5

Mitochondrial Disease: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

  • Overview of Mitochondrial Disease and Nuclear Genetic Causes
    Marni J. Falk, MD
  • Mitochondrial DNA Disease: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention
    Sir Doug Turnbull, MBBS, MD, PhD
1.5

Role of Genome Editing in Research and Therapy

  • Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas Nucleases
    J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD
  • Accelerating Prediction of Tumor Vulnerabilities Using Next-generation Cancer Models
    Jesse S. Boehm, PhD

1.5

 


HOW TO CLAIM SAM:

To earn SAM credit, all learners must watch the webinars, achieve a minimum score of 75-80% on the online quiz, and complete the online survey. To access the quiz and survey click "Submit credit" on the course homepage or click on "My Credit" on the menu to the left.

Click here for detailed instructions on how to claim SAM.

 

SAM Credit

This course is approved by the American Board of Pathology for 11.25 SAM credits. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Participants must successfully complete the online modular exams (answering at least 80% of the questions in a topic module correctly).

 

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Course Information
Course Date:
November 16, 2017
Click on a topic name to see details and purchase options.
Thursday November 16, 2017

An introduction to epigenetics and its relevance to common human disease.

 

Learning Objectives

Define epigenetics.

- Discuss the role of epigenetics in common human disease.

- Explain how epigenetics can be combined with genetics for precision medicine.

 

Duration: 1.25 hr

Recording Date: November 16, 2017

No SAM credit available for this talk.

This presentation will provide an overview of recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the most common mature B-cell malignancy. The speaker will illustrate the most common genes/programs targeted by genetic lesions in this disease, with emphasis on epigenetic modifiers; discuss the role of these genes in normal and malignant B-cells; and highlight how these molecular insights have unveiled novel therapeutic opportunities.

- Define the most common structural alterations associated with major DLBCL subtypes and their prognostic significance.

- Explain how these lesions may favor malignant transformation.

- Identify ways to utilize this information for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

 

The Genomic Landscape of B-Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Charles G. Mullighan, MBBS (Hons), MSc, MD, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA

 

Genetic and Epigenetic Drivers of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

Laura Pasqualucci, MD, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hr

Recording Date: November 16, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

Prior infection with a virus or bacteria can set the stage for development of malignancy. In these presentations the links between two viruses, human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV), and the development of cancer are explored. The role of molecular testing in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease are discussed.

- Review the epidemiology of viral infections and the development of malignancy.

- Discuss the risks and available treatment for HPV and EBV related cancers.

- Explore the types of testing and their role in the diagnosis and monitoring of affected patients.

 

HPV and Head and Neck Cancer
Joseph A. Califano, MD, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA

Blood-based Assessment of EBV DNA as a Tumor Marker
Jennifer A. Kanakry, MD, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hr

Recording Date: November 16, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

The ability to understand the world through the use of molecular tools has led to fascinating discoveries. Maria Dominguez-Bello examines the concept of microbial anthropology, exploring the human microbiome in peoples with different levels of integration to Western lifestyles in the Amazon region and Southern Africa. Jonna Mazet then describes the Global Virome project, a ten-year project to pre-empt emerging pandemic threats by identifying the majority of unknown viruses throughout the world that are likely to infect humans.

- Describe the technologies used to make pathogen discovery possible.

- Explore the differences in microbiota of different groups of humans and the impact of Western lifestyles on the makeup of the human microbiome.

- Review efforts to combat the emergence and re-emergence of high impact viral epidemics and pandemics compromising global health security and well-being of the peoples of the world.

 

Microbial Anthropology
Maria G. Dominguez-Bello, PhD, BSc, MSc, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

A Collaborative Effort to End the Pandemic Era: The Global Virome Project
Jonna Mazet, DVM, MPVM, PhD, One Health Institute, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recording Date: November 16, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

Friday November 17, 2017

The fields of Cancer Genomics and Molecular Pathology are each complex and rapidly changing, and their intersection makes our practice challenging. Supporting clinical care and clinical research in an efficient manner requires an infrastructure to provide access to relevant information and an array of tools to prioritize and present this information in a form that helps advances team goals. These presentations describe informatics approaches that support the Precision Oncology goals of cancer genomic variant effect interpretation based on prior knowledge and statistical recurrence, and on the support of clinical trial activity.

- Discuss two informatics challenges in Precision Oncology.

- Discuss an infrastructure element that addresses one challenge.

- Discuss an analytical tool that addresses one challenge.

 

Molecular Pathology Informatics - Toolsets and Infrastructures for Supporting Clinical Trials
Mark Routbort, MD, PhD, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

Interpreting the Cancer Genome: Identifying Driver Alterations and Therapeutic Options
Nikolaus Schultz, PhD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA*

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recording Date: November 17, 2017

SAM credit available: 0.75 *Only Nikolaus Schultz’s talk is eligible for SAM Credit

The first presentation will discuss the work done in the lab of Dr. Iafrate that focuses on bringing new genetic technologies to cancer diagnostics and the application of these in clinical molecular diagnostic testing. The work has led to the development of a novel next generation sequencing technique termed “Anchored Multiplex PCR (AMP)” that is especially powerful at the detection of gene fusion events from clinical specimens. We have shown that AMP is as sensitive as FISH in diagnosing ALK, ROS1 and RET fusions in lung cancer, and does not require knowing both fusion partners. In addition, AMP can be used for genomic DNA target enrichment and is scalable and cost effective. Current work focuses on ultrasensitive detection of mutations in blood and urine. Genomic sequencing technologies have enabled increasing use of cancer genetic testing for both germline cancer predisposition and somatic mutation profiling in tumors.

The second presentation will review the interplay between germline and somatic findings in cancer genetic testing, with particular emphasis on new areas of clinical utility. These new areas include germline testing of cancer predisposition genes to guide cancer treatment decisions, tumor DNA sequencing to rule out Lynch syndrome, and tumor DNA sequencing used to inform germline variant classification.

- Describe sequencing strategies to identify gene fusions in cancer.

- Discuss key elements required for the validation of gene fusions detected.

- Discuss the clinical utility of NGS-based detection of gene fusions in clinical practice.

- Review when and how testing for inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, and other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is used to guide cancer treatment.

- Describe the clinical scenario and utility of tumor sequencing of mismatch DNA repair genes as part of a Lynch syndrome workup.

- List at least two types of tumor findings that increase the probability that a germline variant in a cancer predisposition gene is pathogenic.

 

Solid Tumor Genotyping: Technical and Clinical Validation with a Focus on Fusions
A. John Iafrate, MD, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Intersection of Germline and Somatic Cancer Variants and New Areas of Clinical Utility
Colin C. Pritchard, MD, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recording Date: November 17, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

Genetic testing for inherited cardiomyopathies has evolved significantly over the last decade. This session will describe the genotypic and phenotypic aspects of cardiomyopathies, including how specific features of the disease can narrow the genetic differential diagnosis. The availability of large sequencing panels for focused diagnostic panels and predictive screening tests, the side effect of variants of uncertain significance, and the need for standardization of variant interpretation will be highlighted.

- Examine the basic pathological and genetic aspects of cardiomyopathies.

- Recognize the impact of clinical and genetic heterogeneity on genetic tests.

- Assess the pros and cons of disease focused gene panels versus whole exome sequencing.

 

Phenotype to Genotype: How Traditional Techniques Pave the Way to Targeted Testing and Individualized Medicine
Joseph J. Maleszewski, MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

From Genes to Genomes: Evolution of Molecular Testing for Inherited Cardiomyopathies
Birgit Funke, PhD, Veritas Genetics, Danvers, MA, USA

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recording Date: November 17, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

Saturday November 18, 2017

In this session, we will provide an overview of genetic-based mitochondrial disease. This will include a discussion of the dual-genome etiology, substantial clinical heterogeneity across all ages, and emerging therapeutic options. Recent genomic sequencing technologies have greatly enabled diagnostic success for these more than 300 distinct genetic diseases. We will also provide a state-of-the art update on prevention of mitochondrial DNA diseases using new in vitro fertilization techniques.

- Recognize that mitochondrial diseases are collectively common genetic conditions due to either nuclear or mtDNA mutations.

- Acknowledge that the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease can be challenging due to marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

- Discuss how NGS diagnostic techniques have transformed the diagnosis.

- Recognize that current treatment of mitochondrial disease is largely symptomatic, but new therapies are emerging and IVF technologies allow potential to prevent disease transmission.

 

Overview of Mitochondrial Disease and Nuclear Genetic Causes
Marni J. Falk, MD, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA and University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Mitochondrial DNA Disease: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention
Sir Doug Turnbull, MBBS, MD, PhD, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recorded Date: November 18, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

In an era of routine high throughput medical and tumor exome sequencing, putative drivers may be readily identified but functional annotation is often lacking and ultimately the genetic underpinnings of many diseases left uncertain. Forward genetic screens evaluate a large number of genomic targets for their relevance to a specific phenotype and recent technological advances permit total gene knockdown that can be applied across many thousands of genes. Sequence-specific programmable nucleases such as CRISPR-Cas9 enable targeted modification of the DNA itself; CRISPR technologies employed with guide RNA libraries can permit genome-scale screening to identify novel mechanisms of phenotypic abnormalities in constitutional and somatic contexts. Directed applications, including in-patient derived cell models, allow for exploration of mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of novel functional elements in the noncoding genome and epigenome.

- Explore the activities and specificities of CRISPR nucleases and the implications for clinical applications.

- Describe how CRISPR screens can identify novel regulatory sites in the genome and epigenome relevant to cancer evolution and chemotherapy resistance.

- Identify applications of genome editing in human cancers using patient-derived cell models for exploration of signaling networks and novel therapeutic targets.

 

Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas Nucleases
J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA

Accelerating Prediction of Tumor Vulnerabilities Using Next-generation Cancer Models
Jesse S. Boehm, PhD, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA

 

Duration: 1.5 hrs

Recording Date: November 18, 2017

SAM credit available: 1.5

Individual topic purchase: Selected
American Board of Pathology
Self-Assessment Module: 11.25
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